Food and Wine in Balance – Interesting Knowledge

Jerry Comfort from Beringer Winery

We all have been taught that white wines go with fish and red wines go with meat (red meat especially) and never the two shall cross.  But my recent Food and Wine in Balance seminar at the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival tore down that pairing barrier.  So you can enjoy a California Cabernet Sauvignon with a steamed fillet of sole.  Really!

Our speaker with Mr. Jerry Comfort, the head/executive sommelier at Beringer Winery in California.  He brought with us the following wines to taste with our food samples:

  • Beringer White Zinfandel 2010
  • Beringer Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc 2009
  • Beringer Napa Valley Chardonnay 2010
  • Beringer Napa Valley Pinot Noir 2006
  • Beringer Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2008

The Food & Wine Balance Rules

First the dominant taste in your dish will change all wines in the same way but to a different degree.  For example, sweetness in your dish will make all wines taste sour (or less sweet).   Your goal is to find a dish that doesn’t change the flavour of the wine too much, as to impair the pairing.

Beringer flight of wines

Second, sweet food can make wine taste sour.  I know I just mentioned it, but previously as an example of the first rule. How does sweetness make wine taste sour?  The sweet food makes our tongue’s tastebuds used to the sweet taste so that we don’t taste the sweetness in the wine.  If you want to taste the sweetness of a wine with a sweet dish, e.g. a dessert, then the wine must be sweeter than the dish.

Third, sourness in a dish makes wine softer, less acidic tasting.  As an example of these last two rules, we tasted the Beringer Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc 2009 with a sweet slice of apple and with a sour wedge of lemon. The Sauvignon Blanc became extremely sour tasting after eating the apple, while the wine became very soft, and you could even taste sweetness from the wine after trying the wine with the lemon.  On it’s own this wine had passion fruit and grapefruit aromas.  High acidity with tropical fruit and vanilla flavours.

Food for wine pairing

Fourth, sweet wines can also make red wines taste more bitter.  Toasted barrels used in red wines leave bitterness on your tongue.  We tested this rule by trying a Beringer Napa Valley Pinot Noir 2006 with some apple and some lemon.  The apple made the Pinot Noir bitter tasting, while the lemon made the Pinot Noir taste soft.  As Jerry, our instructor stated, “Sour food is our friend”. The Pinot Noir on its own had nice violets aroma.  Cinnamon, cloves, soft and round on the palate.  We tried the same test to the Beringer Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2008.  It tasted very dry, tannic and bitter with the apple, yet was quite soft on the palate with the the lemon.

How can sweetness in food make wines both sour and/or bitter?  Well these flavours in the wine were already there.  Sweetness makes these characteristics in the wine even stronger.

Fifth, salt blocks bitterness and acidity.  So salt can soften tannins in red wines, along with lemon.  From this, it would make sense that if you have a dish with low or no salt, that you should pair it with a wine that has little or no oak.  If you can’t eat salt due to health concerns, use acidity to tame those tannins.

As a test of this salt and acidity balancing out bitterness, we had a steamed piece of white fish that we each added lemon and salt.  We then ate a piece of this seasoned fish and a sip of the Beringer Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon.  The pairing worked wonderfully.  Everything was in balance.

We also tried adding some salt and lemon to grilled steak and eating this seasoned steak with a Beringer Napa Valley Chardonnay 2010.  The Chardonnay on it’s own had vanilla, less and tropical fruit aromas.  Round with medium acid, vanilla (from oak) and tropical fruit flavours. The steak did not overpower the Chardonnay.

Sixth, spice (such as black pepper) does not affect sweetness or fruitiness in wine, but does taste spicer with red wines.  We tried some cheese with a black pepper rind with the Beringer California White Zinfandel.  This off-dry wine did not make the pepperiness go away, you just tasted the sweetness in the wine, which then wore off and the pepperiness reappeared.  This cheese with black pepper tasted more spicy with the Cabernet Sauvignon.

How do you deal with spiciness? Again through the proper addition of acidity and salt balanced out the spicy food so that they had less effect on the wine’s flavours, so the wine tasted good.  Adding some lemon juice and salt to the pepper rind cheese made a very nice pairing with the Cab.

Take Away from this Seminar

My take away from this seminar is that you really can enjoy more than one type of wine with a dish, as long a the dish has an appropriate salt & acid balance.  This is important, if you are having a party for example, and you have some people that prefer red wines while others prefer white wines.  Through the proper balancing of the food’s flavours, you can make a dish that both types of wines lovers will love even more.

If you have food with low salt, you may choose a high acid wine, or a wine with low oak. A dish that is very salty would do better with a fortified or a dessert wine (think salty cheese and port).

Overall I thought that this was a really different food & wine pairing event, and one which I would like to try on my own now.  Enjoy!

Enjoying the Northern Icon, Southern Gem, Concha y Toro Dinner

Northern Gem Southern Icon - Concha y Toro at Blue Water Cafe

Northern Gem Southern Icon - Concha y Toro at Blue Water Cafe

The largest and most well-known winery from Chile in my opinion is Viña Concha y Toro.  This winery has been recognized by many wine publications and has 15 awards as “Winery of the Year” in Wine & Spirits.  They are also acknowledged as “Second most powerful wine brand in the world” according to The Power 100 survey by Intangible business.  Concha y Toro does not rest on their past, but still strives to produce wines of extraordinary expression of contemporary Chile. One iconic wine in particular is particularly nurtured each vintage, “Don Melchor“, led by top wine maker, Enrique Tirado, to produce this wine.  With great anticipation, as part of the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival, I arrived at the door of the Blue Water Cafe in Yaletown to sample the carefully crafted and paired coastal cuisine of Executive Chef Frank Pabst with Concha y Toro’s wines.

Leading the tasting is Isabel Guilisasti Gana, the Marketing Director Origin Wines for Concha y Toro and wine maker Tamara Baeremaecker.

Concha y Toro Chardonnay Carmenere and Don Melchor bottles

The Guilisasti family has a long history in Chile and in the wine trade.  Isabel Guilisasti joined Concha y Toro in 2000.  As marketing manager, she is responsible for Concha y Toro’s ultra premium and super premium brands.Tamara joined Concha y Toro in 1998 after receiving her degree in oenology from the Universidad Catolica de Chile. She has worked on many of their premium-brand wines and in 2006 became part of the Don Melchor wine making team.

Our private tasting room at the Blue Water Cafe was laid out as two long table, with each person getting a name card for their particular seat.  It was quite interesting.  Some of the people I sat with were other media, but I also sat with people who were there as they love Chilean wine and Blue Water Cafe.  I had fun chatting with everyone around me.

Our Dinner

Scallop prawn and oyster with Marques de Casa Concha Chardonnay 2009

Our first pairing:

  • Pan seared scallop with fennel basil slaw and kumquat ginger puree, Grilled prawn with garlic and rosemary, mango salsa and avocado, and Smoked Stellar Bayer oyster in brick leaf with white onion grape soubise and toasted hazelnuts. These 3 seafood morsels was paired with Concha y Toro’s Marques de Casa Concha Chardonnay 2009 from the Limari Valley.

I thought the pairing of each seafood, with their own unique flavours and textures, all paired very well with the Chardonnay. The Chardonnay was medium lemon in colour.  A very fruity tropical fruit nose with some vanilla too. Medium plus body with high acidity leaving a prickle on your tongue, but it still had some roundness to it. Full of tropical fruit flavours with vanilla on the finish.  The higher acidity from the wine comes from the cooler coastal Limari Valley.

The scallop was very fresh, seared lightly on the outside and tasted very nice with the citrusy flavour of the kumquat and the fennel flavour of the slaw.  The latin-spiced, grilled prawn with the mango salsa and avocado were nicely complemented by the tropical fruit flavours of the Chardonnay.

White sturgeon with Marques de Casa Concha Carmenere 2009

Our second pairing:

  • Farmed white Sechelt sturgeon with beluga lentils and Berkshire pork cheeks with a mild Madras curry tomato sauce. This was paired with the Marques de Casa Concha Carmenere Peumo vineyard 2009 from the Rapel Valley.

The Carmenere was deep ruby in the glass with a bright rim. Dark fruit, vanilla and very slight capsicum aromas. Very ripe plums, quite spicy with black pepper on the palate. Round and full bodied up front and then lightens up mid-palate.

The sturgeon was soft with fine texture.  The lentils added an earthiness to the dish and the light curry tied the two elements together.  The curry flavour also made a red berry flavour come out of the Carmenere.  Another great pairing.

Bison Churrasco with Don Melchor Cabernet Sauvignon 2008

Our third pairing:

  • Marinated bison flat iron steak, grilled and served with cassava root gnocchi, sauteed salsify, eggplant caviar with oregano, and chimichurri sauce.  Our pairing was the Don Melchor Cabernet Sauvignon 2008, Puente Alto-Maipo Valley.

This was the youngest Don Melchor in our mini-vertical that Concha y Toro provided to us.  Don Melchor, Chile’s first ultra-premium wine is the only one with 21 vintages to its credit that are prize winning and known by wine critic around the world.  Don Melchor is produced from the Cabernet Sauvignon grape from the Puente Alto vineyard in the Alto Maipo Valley near Santiago.  2008 was a cooler vintage for this wine and it was more restrained than the 2007 vintage.  The 2008 Don Melchor was opaque ruby.  Light red cherries, some stemminess and cassis aromas.   Full body.  Very spicy mid palate with ripe plums and cherry flavours.  Dry with some minerality.  As this wine breathed in the glass the cassis flavour became more prominent. Still a young, tight wine, but one that you could enjoy now, or in another 10 or 20 years.

The Bison Churrasco was a wow dish for me.  It was soft, medium rare.  The Chimichurri sauce with olive oil, parsley, cilantro, salt, and garlic flavours really enhanced the bison flavour.  Red wine loves protein and this held true for the Don Melchor and the bison.  In addition the chimichurri sauce I think helped to tone down the spiciness of the wine.

Wagyu beef shortrib with Don Melchor Cabernet Sauvignon 2007 and 1995

Our fourth pairing:

  • Wagyu beef shortrib braised with merken spice and espresso, sauteed portobello mushroom whipped potatoes, green beans, and braising juices reduced with tamarind. To this we had 2 Don Melchor wines.  A 2007 and a 1995 vintage.

The Don Melchor 2007 came from a warmer vintage than the 2008 vintage and you could smell and taste the more opulence of this wine.  It had lots of plum, vanilla and capsicum on the nose.  Very silky mouthfeel.  Peppery round and dry on the palate, with black cherries cassis and oak flavours, and vanilla on the finish.  A very nice wine.

The Don Melchor 1995 is now 17 years old.  You would expect the colour and fruit flavours to have diminished, which they have to some extent.  The wine has changed to a medium plus garnet colour with very slight bricking on the rim. The aromas are more complex with capsicum, chocolate and dark fruit aromas.  Soft, medium body in your mouth.  Pencil leads and dark fruit flavour with higher acidity.  A very balanced, complex wine.

If you have never had Wagyu beef, you should try it.  It is so soft and so buttery rich.  The shortrib was cooked to perfection wit the beef falling apart easily.  I think the Wagyu beef with the big braised flavours with the espresso needed a full bodied wine, and the 2007 Don Melchor fit the bill.  The fruit from this wine paired with the strong flavours of the beef.  The 1995 Don Melchor to me is not as fruity, with more complex aromas and flavours.  It was not quite as good to me with the Wagyu beef, but I would have loved a plate of cheeses to try with it and savour them both together.

Kalamansi honey cheese cake with Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 2008

Our fifth (and last) pairing:

  • Kalamansi honey cheese cake with papaya and strawberry salsa.  Paired with Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 2008 from the Maule Valley.

The Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc 2008 was pear skin in colour.  Honey and peach aromas.  Medium body with honey, spice, peaches, apples and flowers flavours. Medium sweetness.  I think this wine paired nicely with the Kalamansi citrus from the cheese cake and the peachy fruit from the wine.

Blue Water Cafe and Don Melchor

If you have never been to Blue Water Cafe, I hope this review of the food and wine pairing convinces you to enjoy a lunch or dinner with them.  Executive Chef Frank Pabst is recognized for his creative flair and his dedication towards responsible seafood practices.  He has worked in Michelin-starred restaurants throughout Germany and France.  In 2010 he was recognized by Vancouver Magazine as “Chef of the Year” and inducted into the BC Restaurant Hall of Fame.  Quite an achievement.

Here is a web link if you would like to find more information about Concha y Toro’s Don Melchor wine,

I really enjoyed this dinner.  All the food and wine were paired wonderfully by the Blue Water Cafe.  I look forward to the next time I sit down and enjoy dinner with friends there.

A Few Quick Chilean Wines from Thursday’s Vancouver Playhouse Wine Fest

Andrés Ilabaca from Santa Rita winery

Today, Thursday, is the first day of the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival, International Festival Tasting room. I decided to spend most of my time tasting Chilean wines as Chile is the theme country, so there will be many wines brought in specially for this event. Besides tasting I also had a chance to chat with some of the winery principals like Andrés Ilabaca from Vina Santa Rita.

If you are going out to the Tasting Room on Friday or Saturday night, here are a few quick picks:

  • Canepa Reserva Privada Sauvignon Blanc 2011
  • Concha y Toro Gravas del Maipo Syrah 2008
  • Emiliana Vineyards Novas Carmenere Cabernet Sauvignon 2009
  • Emiliana VineyardsWinemaker’s Selection Chardonnay / Viognier / Marsanne / Rousanne 2010 (This wine really impressed me.)
  • Vina Errazuriz Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2011
  • Vina Errazuriz Don Maximiano 2008
  • Lapostolle Casa Chardonnay 2011
  • Lapostolle Cuvee Alexandre Cabernet Sauvignon 2010
  • Miguel Torres Cordillera Chardonnay 2011
  • Vina Montes Alpha Chardonnay 2010
  • Vina Quintay Clava Pinot Noir 2010
  • Vina San Pedro 1865 Cabernet Sauvignon 2010
  • Vina San Pedro Cabo de Hornos 2007
  • Vina Santa Rita Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2011
  • Vina Santa Rita Medalla Real Cabernet Sauvignon 2008
  • Vina Arboleda Sauvignon Blanc 2011

    Emiliana selection of wines

  • Sena 2008
  • Vina Tarapaca Gran Reserva Cabernet Sauvignon 2010
  • Vina Tarapaca Gran Reserva Carmenere 2010
  • Vina Ventisquero Vertice Syrah Carmenere 2007
  • Veramonte Reserva Pinot Noir 2009
  • Veramonte Neyen Carmenere / Cabernet 2008

Detailed tasting notes will follow, but check out these if you have a chance.  My next post I will give you some quick picks for wines for the rest of the world.  Enjoy!

The Chileans are Coming! Preview Notes for You

Flag of Chile

Every year we look forward to our pinnacle wine event, the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival.  Next year’s event will be Feb. 27 – March 4, 2012.  What does this have to do with Chile?  Chile is the theme country for the Festival!

A group of Media, myself included, were invited to a preview of the Chilean wines we can expect to see at the Festival, plus give us some background into this long, thin country.

My Experience in Chile

Karl aka MyWinePal at Casa Lapostolle

Two years ago I travelled down to Chile and visited wineries from the Aconcagua, Maipo, Casablanca, and Colchagua Valleys.  Some of the wineries were Casa Lapostolle, Montgras, Montes, Errazuriz, and Casas del Bosque.   I was impressed with how much the wineries cared for their vineyards and the production of their wines.  One of the nice thing with Chile, is that it is dry due to it’s location on the west coast of South America, and the Andes Mountains on it’s eastern border.  The dry climate, plus topography, and soil factors have made the area a great place to grow grapes.  There is very little, or no, phylloxera louse to attack the grape vines, plus the dryness keeps fungus and mold at bay.  So less pesticides and/or herbicides are needed here.  Many of the wineries in Chile indicate that they are organic or follow organic principles.

Chile’s Natural Advantage

Chile is a wine maker’s paradise.  They get 3 weeks more ripening time than in Bordeaux and 300 + days of sunshine each year.   The cool air from the Andes cools the grapes in the evening so that the grapes mature slowly so that they reach full phenolic ripeness; lots of ripe fruit and a good backbone of acidity. The adjacency to the coast, and the cool Humbolt Current helps produce coastal fog which cools the grapes near the coast, such as from the Casablanca Valley and San Antonio Valley.

What Grapes Grow in Chile?

There is a wide range of red and white grapes grown in Chile.  The top 5 red grapes in order of volume are:

  1. Cabernet Sauvignon
  2. Merlot
  3. Carmenere
  4. Syrah
  5. Pinot Noir

Montes M, Folly and Purple Angel wines

Cabernet is King is Chile.  With the 300+ days of sunshine, the Cabernet Sauvignon grapes produce very full-bodied, ripe, supple wines.  Concha y Toro’s Don Melchor is one of the top quality wines for this grape.  Merlot and Carmenere come in, in 2nd and 3rd place.  Yet they were thought of both being Merlot for many years.  The grapes were planted together in the same vineyard and the grapes and leaves of both vines look very similar.  It was only fairly recently that the Carmenere grape was identified (it’s a Bordeaux grape btw), and has become a signature grape for Chile. A second signature red grape is coming through the ranks, and that is the Syrah grape.  I think people started to recognize Syrah’s potential in Chile, with Aurelio Montes‘ plantings in the Apalta Region of the Colchagua Valley.  There he produces an ultra premium Montes Folly wine from Syrah.

For white grapes, the top 5 varieties are:

  1. Sauvignon Blanc
  2. Chardonnay
  3. Moscatel of Alexandria
  4. Riesling
  5. Viognier

Casas del Bosque Sauvignon Blanc and Reserva Chardonnay

Most people probably think of Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay when they think of white wines from Chile.  Probably also the Casablanca Valley, where a lot of very good Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay are produced. An upcoming region for Sauvignon Blanc is slightly south of the Casablanca Valley and much closer to the coast is the Leyda Valley.  While the Sauvignon Blanc wine from the Casablanca Valley can be more tropical fruit, from the Leyda Valley, expect more citrus and herbal aromas and flavours.  Have you ever heard of Moscatel of Alexandria?  You might not have, but you probably have tried some Chilean Pisco.  Pisco is produced from the Moscatel grape.  Riesling and Viognier and two grapes with great potential.  I don’t think a particular region is well-known enough for these grapes, but I would hazard to guess that the Riesling grape would be very good in the Casablanca and San Antonio Valleys while Viognier would shine in the more inland, warmer regions, like Aconcagua, Maipo and Colchagua Valleys.

Wines We Tasted at the Media Preview

Montgras Santa Carolina and Undurraga Sauvignon Blancs

We enjoyed 3 Sauvignon Blancs and a range of single varietals and red blends.  The three Sauvignon Blancs:

  • Montgras Amaral Sauvignon Blanc 2009 (Leyda Valley). Light straw colour with a green tinge. Gooseberry and sweet honey nose. Light body with medium plus acidity.  Gooseberry and citrus flavours.  Medium length. My favorite of the these 3 wines.
  •  Vina Santa Carolina Reserva Sauvignon Blanc 2010 (Leyda Valley). Light lemon colour with herbal, asparagus and mint on the nose.  Round mouth feel with light body. Herbal, citrus and green apple fruit flavours with some minerality on the palate.  Quite sour on the finish.
  • Undurraga Terroir Hunter Leyda Sauvignon Blanc 2008 (Leyda Valley). 2008 was a later harvest than the other years, resulting in riper more tropical fruit flavours.  This wine was light lemon/green in colour.  Tropical fruit, lees and oak on the nose.  Light body,  round mouth feel but also has a good backbone of acidity. Oaky, smoky, citrus flavours.  Long length.

Wide range of Chilean red wines

Our red wines included single varietal Pinot Noir, Carmenere, and Cabernet Sauvignon, and blends.  The wines are:

  • Cono Sur Ocio Pinot Noir 2009 (Casablanca Valley). Medium ruby, Vanilla and cherry aromas. Medium body, dry, but full fruit, cherry flavours.  Vanilla in the back ground and some spiciness and raspberry leaf.  Slightly sweet cherry finish.
  • Emiliana Vineyards COYAM 2007 (Colchagua Valley). This is a biodynamic wine, which goes beyond organic wine making principles. Opaque garnet in the glass with ripe black fruit, vanilla, dark chocolate and cherrie aromas.  Full body, very round, with milk chocolate and ripe cherry flavours.  Some spice, raspberry leaf and vanilla on the finish.  A very high quality, balanced wine. You can read about biodynamic wines at this link.
  • Vina Maipo Gran Devocion Carmenere Syrah 2008 (Maule Valley). This blend is 75% Carmenere and 25% Syrah.  Deep ruby colour.  Meaty sausage and ripe cherry aromas. Full body, round with minerality.  Cherries, blueberries and vanilla flavours.   Medium plus acidity gives this wine bright flavours.
  • Carmen Gran Reserva Carmenere 2009 (Apalta Valley).  Some dustiness on the nose, along with ripe cherries, capsicum and vanilla.  Medium minus body with high acidity and soft tannins.  Dark chocolate and cherry flavours with a mineral streak running through the wine. Not mouth filling but very pleasant sensation in your mouth.
  • Vina Montes Limited Selection Cabernet Carmenere 2010 (Colchagua Valley). The nose on this wine was a little closed, but I did get some nutmeg and cherry aromas. But on the palate, nutmeg, cedar and dark fruit flavours jump out.  Round mouth feel, dry with some spiciness.
  • Santa Rita Medalla Real Cabernet Sauvignon 2008 (Maipo Valley). Deep garnet in colour with cedar and ripe fruit aromas. Full body, rich feeling ,with  ripe dark fruit flavours and vanilla.  Dry with soft tannins and cedar on the finish.  This is a real good value wine at $19.99 a bottle. Also try their Medalla Real Pinot Noir!
  • Cousino-Macul Antiguas Reservas Cabernet Sauvignon 2008 (Maipo Valley). This wine I think is starting to show it’s age as there is a slightly brownish tinge to an otherwise garnet colour in the glass. Some dark fruit on the nose.  Medium body, light mouth feel, with juicy black fruit flavour.  An elegant wine.
  • Concha y Toro Marques de Casa Concha Cabernet 2009 (Maipo Valley). Deep dark core with a ruby rim in the glass. Vanilla, dark fruit and oak/cedar aromas. Full body, round mouth feel with soft tannins.  Light vanilla with some mintiness.
  • Vina Chocalan Gran Reserva Blend 2009 (Maipo Valley). This is a blend of 6 grapes: Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Cabernet Franc, Carmenere, Petit Verdot, and Syrah.  Opaque garnet in the glass. Nice cedar, allspice and vanilla on the nose. Very round in your mouth with soft tannins. Allspice, cedar and ripe black fruit flavours.  Nice texture.  A favorite wine of many of the media I spoke with.

If these wines have enticed you, you may want to buy advance tickets to the Playhouse Wine Festival.  Here is my link to the tickets.  Enjoy and Salud!

Salud Chile – Advance Tickets to Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival

Have you been thinking about what to buy for someone who has everything for Christmas? or something for yourself?  How about some advance tickets to the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival?

Tickets just went on sale this week.  The advance tickets are LIMITED, so buy them quickly before they are sold out.   Chile is the theme country for the wine festival.  I’ve been to Chile and visited many wineries and I can tell you that they produce fantastic wines and that I’m really looking forward to seeing the wineries here in Vancouver.  Come try some rising stars: Syrah and Carmenere, along with their well-known Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Here is the announcement from the Festival.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Salud Chile Pack –  3 Events for $219

 

Buy tickets 604-873-3311
Toll Free: 1-877-321-3121
In Person at: 601 Hamilton Street: Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Box Office
 
Advance pack price $219 (includes HST and ticket service charges)
The Salud Chile Pack is available by phone or in person only.The Salud Chile Pack includes:

Taste Chile
Tuesday, February 28, 2012
8:00PM to 10:00PM
The Waldorf Hotel

Single Ticket: $55 (Buy Online)

Group Rate (8 or more): $45 (Available only in person and by phone – no web sales)
Kick off the festival with an evening of wine, food and music at the Waldorf Hotel. Let the venue take you back to 1947 while the wines bring you up to speed on what this exciting region has to offer. Despite nearly 500 years of winemaking, Chile’s wine industry is fresh, young, and boldly evolving to meet the needs of today’s consumers. Chilean styled canapés will pair wonderfully with the exceptional wines from more than 20 wineries while the beats of resident DJ El Garzita will set the mood. Celebrate Chile
Saturday, March 3rd, 2012
12:30PM to 2:30PM
Vancouver Convention Centre West
Single Ticket: $99 (Buy Online)  
Group Rate (8 or more): $90  (Available only in person and by phone – no web sales) 
Wines of Chile has tasked VCC Executive Chef Blair Rasmussen with the seemingly impossible task of creating a Chilean themed menu to pair with more than 70 Chilean wines. Chef Rasmussen will no doubt rise to the challenge and create some amazing synergies between our own Pacific Northwest cuisine and the wonderful flavours of Chilean dishes. Your challenge will be to try and figure out which wine and food pairing you love most!

Also included in the price of the Salud Chile Theme Region Pack is an evening session in either the Thursday, Friday or Saturday International Festival Tasting.

International Festival Tasting
Thursday, Friday or Saturday (March 1 to March 3, 2012)
7:00PM to 10:00PM
Vancouver Convention Centre West


Gold Pass – $425 
Thurs – Sat, March 1 – March 3, 2012
VCC West
1055 Canada Place, Vancouver, BC
Various Times
Advance: $425 (Regular: $460)
Buy tickets 604-873-3311
Toll Free: 1-877-321-3121
In Person at: 601 Hamilton Street: Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Box Office

The Gold Pass is available by phone or in person only (no web sales).Enjoy the red carpet treatment with our Gold Pass. A terrific value, this pass offers incomparable access to the Festival.
* Three evenings (Thursday, Friday and Saturday) in the International Festival Tasting Room (a $285 value) 7:00pm to 10:00pm
* Two afternoons (Thursday and Friday) at the exclusive Trade Tasting sessions in the International Festival Tasting Room (a $80 value) 2:30pm to 5:00pm
* Admission to the Curtain Raiser VIP reception on Thursday from 6:00-7:00 pm (not available for public sale).
*Admission to the Gold Pass Tasting Lounge on Friday and Saturday from 5:30-9:00 pm, featuring:
– A selection of premium wines from the Tasting Room and special events
– Enjoy a selection of canapés and cheeses
($190 value)
* Priority access to the Tasting Room – no line-ups!

International Festival Tasting

Thursday March 1, 2012 / Friday March 2, 2012 / Saturday March 3, 2012
VCC West
1055 Canada Place, Vancouver, BC
7:00pm – 10:00pm
 
Buy tickets 604-873-3311
Toll Free: 1-877-321-3121
In Person at: 601 Hamilton Street: Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Box Office
International Festival Tasting Tickets are available Online

The Tasting Room offers a unique opportunity to taste rare bottles and discover new treasures as you visit with renowned winery principals from around the globe. At each booth you will find a winery principal, identified by his or her royal blue lanyard. This person is a senior member of the winery, intimately involved in the wine-producing process as a winemaker, proprietor or senior executive. Nowhere else in the world will you find a gathering of these talented men and women pouring wine and answering questions under one roof. Take the opportunity to ask questions and learn from the experts about your favourite wine.


Thursday night’s capacity is guaranteed to be 25 percent lower than the other two evenings, attracting wine collectors and trade professionals who appreciate more room to interact with the winery principals.
 
Friday is great for groups and the after-work crowd looking to kick off the weekend in style.

Saturday night is perfect for couples and friends wanting to spend a night on the town.

Highlights from the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Fest – Day 1

Yesterday was a day of tasting primarily Spanish wines at the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival. Quite a range from sherries to white, red, and Cavas to choose from. I haven’t been able to get through them all, but here are the names of a few bottles you may want to try if you go to the International Tasting room tonight or tomorrow night. Full reviews for these wines and others will come after the festival on my main www.MyWinePal.com website.

My Spanish Wine Picks for Day 1:

  • Alvaro Palacios Remonda la Vendimia 2009
  • Alvaro Palacios Remonda la Montessa 2007
  • Bodegas Chivite Gran Feudo Edicion Vinas Viejas Reserva 2005
  • Grupo Faustino Fortius Reserva 2004
  • Freixenet Elyssia Pinot Noir (sparkling)
  • Gonzalez Byass Finca Constancia Cosecha 2008
  • Marques de Riscal Gran Reserva 2003 (my favorite of the night)
  • Bodegas Olivares Rose 2010 ($12 bottle of rose is a great deal!)
  • Cavas Pares Balta Blanc de Pacs 2010 (a still white made from traditional Cava grapes. Great flavour. It is organic too.)

Most of the red wines above are 100% tempranillo, or a blend with tempranillo. Note that there are many other wines I could add to this list, but today I’m keeping things short.

Today is tasting room time again. I’ll be trying the rest of the world mainly, and finish off a bit of Spain. Saturday is jam packed for me, attending the New Zealand Perfect Pairings, the grenache seminar, and the Cinq a Sept French event. I hope you get a chance to try one of the above wines, and to meet you at one of the events. Please say Hi. Enjoy!

Wineries Attending the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival #VPIWF

If you have not visited the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival, they do have a PDF brochure now available. It describes the different wine tasting events, and has a listing of all the wineries attending this year.

I thought you may want to see the list of wineries attending, so I posted them below, plus some comments on my part for wineries that you may want to visit if you attend the International Festival tasting (aka the Big Room).

As Spain is the featured country, you will see many Spanish wineries in the list.  In the Spanish list, there is every style of wine to interest you: sherry, sparkling (Cava), red and white still wines. Bodegas Alvear, González Byass, Miguel Torres, and Bodegas Faustino are a few to try.  You might want to try them all.  I will.  For Argentina, try Graffigna and Bodega Alta Vista (nice Malbec) and Familia Zuccardi (Their Q series is quite good). For Australia try Buller (maybe they will be pouring a sticky?), Chapel Hill, Langmeil, and Heggies.  From BC, try them all.  For Chile there is Vina Errazuriz, Lapostolle, Miguel Torres, Montes, and Vina Santa Rita. France, try them all if you have a chance.  Chapoutier is one of my favorites.  There are many more.  I think I’ll make a full listing of my picks on an upcoming blog article.

SPAIN ARGENTINA
Bodegas Abanico Bodega Alta Vista
Alvaro Palacios Belasco de Baquedano
Bodegas Alvear Viña Cobos
Bodegas Arúspide Bodega Colomé /
Axial Vinos Decero
Bodegas Chivite Viña Doña Paula
Codorníu Graffigna
Domecq Bodegas Humberto Canale
Bodegas Ercavìo Domaine Jean Bousquet
Bodegas Faustino Luigi Bosca
Grupo Faustino O. Fournier
Freixenet Bodegas Pascual Toso
González Byass Bodega Vistalba
Grandes Vinos y Viñedos Familia Zuccardi
Bodegas Hidalgo –
La Gitana S.A.
Iberwine
Bodegas Juan Gil AUSTRALIA
Marqués de Riscal Buller Wines
Bodegas Martín Códax Casella Wines
Viña Mayor / Chapel Hill
Bodegas Palacio Greg Norman Estates
Miguel Torres Henry’s Drive Vignerons
Bodegas Olivares Inland Trading Co.
Orowines Jim Barry / Heggies
Osborne Josef Chromy Wines
Cavas Parés Baltà Langmeil
Bodegas Piqueras Majella Wines
Ramón Bilbao Peter Lehmann Wines
Vinos y Viñedos Robert Oatley Vineyards
Bodegas San Valero Shingleback Wines
Segura Viudas St Hallett
Sierra Cantabria Wyndham Estate
Solar Viejo Xanadu
Telmo Rodríguez Yabby Lake Vineyard
Bodegas Valdemar
CANADA CHILE
BRITISH COLUMBIA Viña Caliterra
Artisan Sakemaker Concha y Toro
at Granville Island Cono Sur
Averill Creek Vineyard Viña Errázuriz
Cassini Cellars Lapostolle
Herder Winery & Vineyards Viña Leyda / Viña Tabalí
Hester Creek Estate Winery Viña Maipo
Jackson-Triggs Miguel Torres
Okanagan Estate Montes
Meyer Family Vineyards Viña Santa Rita
Mission Hill Family Estate Viu Manent
Nk’Mip Cellars
Noble Ridge FRANCE
Vineyard and Winery Boutinot
Osoyoos Larose Cave de Tain
Painted Rock Estate Winery M. Chapoutier
Poplar Grove Winery Delas Frères /
Quails’ Gate Winery Champagne Deutz
Red Rooster Winery Vins & Vignobles Dourthe
Sandhill Domaines de Les
Sperling Vineyards Grands Chais de France
Summerhill Pyramid Winery Joseph Drouhin
Tantalus Vineyards Champagne Lallier
Domaine Louis Moreau
ONTARIO Ogier Caves des Papes
Henry of Pelham Paul Mas
Pillitteri Estates Winery Perrin & Fils
Wayne Gretzky Estate Winery Pfaffenheim
Pierre Sparr
GERMANY ITALY
Balthasar Ress Antinori
Bürgerspital Estate Azienda Vitivinicola
Deinhard Accordini Igino
Henkell Badia a Coltibuono
Schloss Reinhartshausen Bastianich / La Mozza
Schloss Schonborn Beni di Batasiolo
St. Urbans-Hof Fontanafredda
Mionetto
Pasqua
GREECE Rocca Delle Macìe
Boutari Tenuta Sant’Antonio
Santa Margherita /
Ca’ del Bosco
ISRAEL Tedeschi
Galil Mountain Winery /
Yarden
NEW ZEALAND
PORTUGAL Astrolabe
Aveleda Giesen Wine Estate
Blandy’s Madeira Kim Crawford Wines
Fonseca Guimaraens Man O’War Vineyards
Quinta do Crasto Mud House Wines
Quinta do Vale Dona Maria Oyster Bay Wines
Sogrape Vinhos Sacred Hill Wines
Symington – Dow’s Port Stoneleigh
Symington – Graham’s Port
Taylor Fladgate / Croft
USA
CALIFORNIA
SOUTH AFRICA Bonterra Vineyards
Boekenhoutskloof Caymus Winery
Durbanville Hills Clos Du Val
Graham Beck Wines Delicato Family Vineyards
KWV Wines Francis Ford Coppola
Nederburg
Glen Carlou
Presents LLC
J. Lohr Vineyards
& Wines
OREGON Louis M Martini
King Estate Miner Family Vineyards
Quady Winery
Ravenswood Winery
WASHINGTON Ridge Vineyards
Columbia Crest Robert Mondavi Winery
Hedges Family Estates / Rodney Strong Vineyards
Snoqualmie Vineyards Signorello Estate /
Edge Winery / Fuse Wines
Stags’ Leap
Trefethen Family
Vineyards
Truchard Vineyards
Wente Vineyards

Here is the download link for the Vancouver Playhouse International Wine Festival brochure.  Enjoy!